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Breed Review: Weimaraner (18 Pics)

Weimaraner has great looks. This elegant dog with refined forms seemed to have jumped from the paintings of the Renaissance painters. Her impetuous appearance eloquently demonstrates that at any moment she is ready to rush over the horizon and return, holding her prey in her mouth. However, within the walls of his home, the Weimaraner easily forgets about his hunting purpose, transforming into an affectionate, gentle friend who loves his family and constantly strives to take a place at the feet of his adored owner.

#1 The Weimaraner, or Weimar Pointing Dog, is a very rare representative in the cohort of hunting dogs.

This aristocratic dog presumably traces its ancestry back to the Middle Ages, although today's breed standards only developed at the turn of the 18th-19th centuries.

#2 The Weimaraner belongs to the group of heirs of European (or continental) marriages – short-haired pointing dogs, which have long been common on the European continent and have similar characteristics of both exterior and working qualities.

Among its close relatives, this dog stands out sharply for its original gray color with spectacular tints, which makes a popular version of its long-standing relationship with the so-called dogs of Saint Louis (Chiens Gris de St-Loi), a description of which can be found in ancient handwritten sources of the legendary era of the Crusades ... In the chronicles dating back to the XIII century, it is said that at the court of the French king Louis IX, known as Louis the Saint, gray silver dogs appeared in 1254, after his return to his homeland from another campaign to the East.

#3 In medieval literary sources, there are references to the fact that these dogs were from Tartaria – this is how the territory stretching from the borders of Central Asia to its northern limits was called in Latin-speaking countries.

Perhaps the animals were donated to Louis by one of the Asian rulers, with whom the French monarch decided to establish contacts while in Palestine. The most detailed description of the cops is contained in the "Book of the Hunt" - one of the best medieval treatises on this entertainment of kings and aristocrats. Its author is Count Gaston de Foix, one of the military leaders of the Hundred Years War and a passionate hunter.

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